MONDO Covid-19 has also closed the Museums to the public but has released creativity and among the initiatives born on the web and social media for the “Cultural Resistance”, one in particular continues to entertain the world of Art, the challenge #BetweenArtAndQuarantine or – in Dutch, mother tongue of the project – #TussenKunstenQuarantaine.

WORLD Here are some tools collected in these days of #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd e #BlackLivesMatter, imagining a mini digital library for anti-racism – a page in progress, to update also with your contribution and which, given the global theme, collects resources especially but not only in English; a page made of links to information, essays, stories, books, podcasts, videos that help us to see the world from the other point of view.

E come tantissime altre persone, tutte quelle che credono che la felicità sia un diritto universale, il fine naturale e ultimo della specie umana. “Non so se vivrò abbastanza per poter verificare che l’umanità è riuscita ad arrivare alla pratica quotidiana, normale di questo diritto alla felicità, ma so e sono convinto che lo sforzo di tanti, anche il mio piccolo sforzo per spiegare, per definire, per individuare tutto quel che si frappone tra noi e il diritto supremo alla felicità, sia oggi il lavoro politico più importante che si può fare.” – Luis Sepúlveda

PISTOIA A few summers ago, while we were hosting the #CCTravellers in the Italian Capital of Culture 2017, we discovered a place that we fell in love with at the first encounter. Yes, with Castagno di Piteccio it was love at first sight. And among the Creative Curious Travellers, who came to Tuscany from various parts of the World, with whom we repeatedly visited this tiny #BorgoMuseo a few kilometers from the city, there’s even someone who told us: “it is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen”.

PARIS without its Tour Eiffel. Impossible even to imagine, today. But if some French intellectuals would have won their battle, the Iron Lady (Dame de Fer) might have survived for maybe just twenty years or maybe less. The French originally hated it. If not all, certainly an important group of high-profile artists, thinkers and creatives who signed a petition to protest against the tower during its construction. They expressed all their hate towards this “useless” and “monstrous” monument with a love letter to their City of Lights (Ville Lumière) and finesse, published on Valentine’s Day 1887.

PALERMO “Why her? Why give her a space? Some people thought I was looking for a space to show my photos but here you won’t see my works. The ambition is much higher. I want to see others grow, I want to discover talents and cultivate them. And so what you will see won’t be my photos but, near the door of my studio, a red neon made by Riccardo Gueci: picchì idda?”